The wedding invitation is a sneak peak at the actual event. It tells guests the mood of the ceremony, casual or formal, for example. It gives them pertinent details to RSVP, find the location and when to attend. This information comes via some rather complex, yet seamless, etiquette standards. The most effici... read more

The wedding invitation is a sneak peak at the actual event. It tells guests the mood of the ceremony, casual or formal, for example. It gives them pertinent details to RSVP, find the location and when to attend. This information comes via some rather complex, yet seamless, etiquette standards. The most efficient way to approach the design of this all too critical piece of wedding protocol is one section at a time. Let’s start with the “Host Line.”

What’s a Host Line?
The host line is about acknowledgement — think of it as a written toast that says thanks for everything. Old-fashioned wedding etiquette says the bride’s parents host the event and that holds true even in today’s modern designs. Since the times are changing, however, it is okay to include other people in this area, as well, such as the groom’s parents, the happy couple or key family members.

What if the parents are not paying for the wedding?
Are non-paying parents still considered hosts? Maybe, but it is up to the couple to consider all the relevant factors. Host line honors generally go to the people who take on the financial burden of the event. Financial contribution is part of the formula.

The Simple Host Line
For traditional weddings where the bride’s parents are the key contributors, they will dominate the host line.

Mr. and Mrs. John Doe
invite you to the wedding of their daughter
Sally Doe
to
Mr. James Madison

This is the traditional host line — it lists the formal names of the bride’s parents as the event hosts with no mention of any other party.

When Sharing Finances
Remember, the host line is an acknowledgement, so if both sets of parents contribute, common sense says they both should get that acknowledgement. This represents a 50/50 split of the financial burden.

Mr. and Mrs. John Doe
Mr. and Mrs. Madison
invite you to the wedding of their children
Sally Doe
to
Mr. James Madison

The first line always goes to the bride’s family — even if the monetary split isn’t equal.

Acknowledging parents as something other than hosts.
The term “host” defines who pays for the wedding. In some cases, the couple may want to acknowledge both parents without listing them both as hosts.

Mr. and Mrs. John Doe
invite you to the wedding of their daughter
Sally Doe
to
Mr. James Madison
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Madison

This gives the groom’s parents respectful accolades without actually making them hosts.

The Casual Bride and Groom
It is becoming more and more common to take a casual approach to the host line section of the wedding invitation.

Sally Doe
and
James Madison
together with their families
invite you to the celebration of their wedding

The last line can go many ways.
… celebration of their love
… their joining in holy matrimony
… the beginning of their journey together
Just to name a few. This is a less formal way to manage the host line, so there is more leeway on the wording.

{Top Image found here}

Comments closed