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Why do some wedding invitations use "honour" and others "honor" on the request line? You might have thought the invitation would be one of the easier tasks for your wedding, but there is more to it than meets the eye. The invitation makes a statement about the event and putting together the proper request lin... read more

Why do some wedding invitations use “honour” and others “honor” on the request line? You might have thought the invitation would be one of the easier tasks for your wedding, but there is more to it than meets the eye. The invitation makes a statement about the event and putting together the proper request line is part of it.

What is a Request Line?
Pretty much every wedding initiation has one — a line that asks people to come to the celebration. The request line invites guests to attend. The wording of that request gets a little tricky. Traditionally, it implies whether or not the service will be held in a place of worship such as a church, temple or synagogue. That is the tradition behind using the word “honour” with the formal spelling — to show deference to God.
Modern day wedding etiquette is less stringent, but this is one of those old traditions that continue even today.

Location of the Request Line
The request line comes immediately after the host presentation.

Mr. and Mrs. John Public
request the honour of your presence

Request Line Wording
There are two formal ways to present the request line.
“… request the honour of your presence”
“… request the pleasure of your company”
Both are proper for a formal or casual church wedding.

What’s up with the Spelling?
This is one area with some flexibility. “Honour” is the English spelling of the word and feels more traditional. “Honor” is acceptable too, however. It is a matter of personal taste.

What to do When the Wedding is not a Church Affair?
Weddings are really about tradition and this is one that holds true. The wording: “… request the honour of your presence” is reserved for ceremonies held at a religious site. It works for any spiritual location or religious denomination. It is considered bad form to use that phrase for a backyard wedding, however.
When having your wedding outside the church, you should opt for an alternative request line. Here are some request line examples for those wedding invitations.

“… invite you to witness the marriage of …”
“… ask you to help celebrate …”
“… joyfully invite …”
“… ask for the pleasure of your company …”

The only restriction is the use of the word “honour” or “honor” when designing an invitation for a wedding held in an alternative location.

{Top image via Wide Eyes Design}

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